There Is No Such Thing as a Good Try

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By Gary Pudles

Note: I recently saw this in a sales newsletter and thought it would make for a great blog post. Enjoy! G.P.

Let’s conduct an experiment. In a moment, I want you to stop reading and try to minimize your browser window. After the window is minimized, count to 10 and re-open your browser; then continue from where you let off. Remember to note your place.

On your mark, get set, go! Try to minimize your browser window. Go ahead, give it a good try. Did you do it?

If you did, you didn’t try; you actually minimized the browser window. If you didn’t minimize the browser, it’s because you didn’t try.

Confused? Don’t be.

Just remember Yoda’s words from The Empire Strikes Back:
“Do. Or do not. There is no try.”

Here’s the point. Yoda was right. There is no “try.” You either do something or you don’t. “Try” is a weaselly word. At best, “try” communicates an intention, not a commitment.

With this point in mind, consider the following statements:
• “I’ll try to make some prospecting calls today.”
• “I’ll try to get back to the prospect this week.”
• “I’ll try to get a decision from the prospect before the end of the month.”
• “I’ll try to get that report done by tomorrow afternoon.”

You either schedule time for the activity, then do it; or you don’t. There is no
in-between.

Suppose we extend the “try” concepts to other areas of our lives:
• “I’ll try to stop for the red traffic light.”
• “I’ll try to love my children.”
• “I’ll try to look both ways before crossing the street.”

When the outcome is important, we leave “try” out of the equation.

Don’t Try – Commit.

The next time you’re about to say that you’ll “try” something, reconsider your approach. If the outcome of the activity is important, don’t try; instead, commit. If the activity isn’t important, then why even try?

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